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goatdog

Movies about the movies are one of my favorite subgenres, so I definitely have to see this. We showed an interesting cartoon at my theater a few seasons ago called "The Original Movie" (1922), about how movies were made during the Stone Age. It was animated with silhouettes (by Tony Sarg, who designed the first Macy's parade balloons). It sounds like it would make a good companion piece to this film.

No, I don't sit at home hitting reload waiting for you to put up a new post. It hasn't come to that--yet.

Thom

You have a great sense of humor, Mike. I like that. The Original Movie does seem to be a good fit for this picture. I've done a couple write-ups about animated films, and I'd like to do more. This gives me an idea (more about that later).

I also like movies about the movies. One reason is to see how such films mix multiple layers of make-believe while purporting to show reality. For example, Chaplin is playing Chaplin in his cameo in Souls instead of playing the Tramp, nevertheless he's still performing a part for the camera.

I think your best bet to see Souls For Sale is TCM. I grabbed it on the DVR when that channel broadcast it months ago (it's part of their young composers project) and saved it until 1923 came around.

goatdog

I remembered a couple of other shorts we showed about Hollywood: The Life and Death of 9413, a Hollywood Extra (1928), an expressionist short by Robert Florey and Slavko Vorkapich; and So You Want to Be in Pictures (1947), a comedy starring George O'Hanlon. I think they're both on DVD; since you like expressionism, you should definitely try to find the Florey one.

Thom

Hmm...I seem to recall someone posting something about The Life and Death of 9413, a Hollywood Extra for last year's Avant-Garde Blog-a-Thon. I'll see if I can track down the post and then watch the film. It must be on Unseen Cinema. Thanks for the suggestion, M.

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